“Let Not the Poor Jews be Forgotten”: The Place of Israel in Andrew Fuller’s Theology

This paper argues that Andrew Fuller’s eschatological thought gives a central role to the Jews in the redemptive plan of God. Fuller’s belief in the Jews’ future conversion and restoration is shown to be a key fixture of his theology. This paper first provides an explanation of Fuller’s eschatological framework, characterized by postmillennialism and a focus on the Jews’ conversion and restoration. Second, the paper surveys the history of the Jews in England from their expulsion in 1290 to the Georgian period, providing a context for Fuller’s theological perspective. Third, the paper examines Fuller’s theology of the Jewish people, focusing on his involvement with the London Society for Promoting Christianity Amongst the Jews. Overall, this paper argues that Fuller’s eschatology was deeply influenced by his belief in the Jews’ future conversion and restoration and that this belief played a central role in his theological thought.

5 thoughts on ““Let Not the Poor Jews be Forgotten”: The Place of Israel in Andrew Fuller’s Theology”

  1. “superb presentation”
    Haykin’s recommendation said this was a “superb presentation.” It is an interesting and fitting topic, so I would be willing to include it in our session based on Haykin’s strong recommendation.

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  2. Interesting
    I think this would make a good contribution to our unit. Sounds like it is trying to accomplish quite a bit, though. I agree, Haykin’s recommendation is a strong vote of confidence.

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  3. Does he say anything new?
    I don’t know a thing about Andrew Fuller, but the proposal’s stated thesis seems merely descriptive of Fuller’s theology, without any indication as to whether the centrality of the Jews to Fuller’s eschatology is already well known. Is the claim that this aspect of Fuller’s theology has not been appreciated? Or that some other issue has previously been seen as central?

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