Making Room for the Infertile: The Need for Hospitality in the Church Towards the Childless

A study done in 2010 by The National Survey of Family Growth estimated that 16% of all pregnancies end in miscarriage and another 2% end in still birth. The study evaluated the impact of these losses on the relationship of the family and found that in the United States, only 57% of all first marriages and 31% of all first cohabitations survive more than 15 years after infertility or miscarriages. Further, the CDC notes that In the United States, among heterosexual women aged 15 to 49 years with no prior births, about 1 in 5 (19%) are unable to get pregnant after one year of trying. The CDC also notes that about 1 in 4 (26%) women in this group have difficulty getting pregnant or carrying a pregnancy to term. Despite how common of an ailment infertility is even in the western world, the church finds itself unprepared and unable to respond hospitably towards families who have remained childless. This paper seeks to show the biblical basis for hospitality towards the childless. It will then explore the ways in which the church has failed to show hospitality towards the childless. Finally, it will attempt to provide a way forward for the church by providing the beginning of a practical theology for hospitality towards the childless.

3 thoughts on “Making Room for the Infertile: The Need for Hospitality in the Church Towards the Childless”

  1. With some work, this might be a good bioethics section paper
    The topic is a noble one and needs attention. The proposal should give less time to data and more space to how exactly the proposed kindness to infertility would look.
    With some work, this might be a good bioethics paper next year.

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